How Could It Be Fair to Kill Canaanite Children?

In a prior post we saw that the Canaanite childhood was full of terror and loathing. How could it not be when some friends and siblings were burnt to death in the arms of the bull-headed god Molech, family members raped them, and animals were brought into the house for sexual entertainment? Then in my last post on the Canaanites we saw why Israel could not adopt these children without the Israelites, themselves, becoming corrupted

In this post we answer the last question specifically regarding Canaanite children: how could it in any sense be fair for God to order their deaths? There are several things to say about this.

First, it is not always wrong to kill those innocent of wrongdoing. Of course that seems counterintuitive but Paul Copan and Matthew Flannagan in their book, Did God Really Command Genocide?, provide a timely illustration: Continue reading

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Sci Fi, Free Will, and the Problem of Evil

In teaching every semester on why God allows evil, I’ve learned that many Christians do not understand the nature or value of free will. Indeed, many years ago I too struggled with what free will is all about, but found an unlikely ally in science fiction. Sci-fi books, movies, and television programs frequently feature free will as a major theme and thus help illumine this abstract topic.

Since many more people see science fiction on big and small screens than read sci-fi books, I will use only examples from movies and television where these themes are staples of the sci-fi genre. Most of these shows did very well at the box office or in TV ratings, and were very well received by critics; many also spawned popular video games.

Movies and television shows develop this subject partially because free-will science fiction resonates with themes much larger than most people imagine: Continue reading

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Christians Should Be More Accepting?

So many tell us that Christians should be more accepting of homosexuality. Yesterday, in fact, I listened to Andrew Wilson debate Rob Bell on the UK Unbelievable? radio program about homosexuality and the church. Bell was asked to explain the justification for his beliefs that there is nothing wrong with committed homosexual relationships, and, among other things, he said, “This is sort of the bullshit that really, really, really, pushes people away, is when you have a particular conviction and all of a sudden your orthodoxy or your faithfulness to Jesus is all of a sudden called into question…. This is why so many people don’t want to be a part of the church.”

Indeed, I’ve heard that a lot lately. Something to the effect of, “Christians should be more accepting! If you were, more people would join the church. Instead, you’re driving people away.” Continue reading

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Why Couldn’t Israel Adopt Canaanite Children?

As I pointed out in a previous post, when God freed the Israelites from Egyptian slavery, He told them to drive the Canaanites out of a portion of land promised to Abraham’s descendants. The Israelites’ coming was preceded by miracles such as the Red Sea and Jordan River parting, so the Canaanites knew there was something supernatural behind their advance. Some chose to flee; some chose to fight.

And, as I’ve argued in another post, we don’t have any reason to believe that even one of the Canaanite adults that died in the fighting wasn’t guilty of great wickedness; that was, after all, the reason God gave for driving them out of the land. But what about their children, some of whom died?

In ancient wars where parents died, soldiers faced three alternatives for the children: (1) take their lives; (2) leave them to starve and be eaten by animals in the desert; or (3) adopt them. Obviously leaving them to starve or be eaten would be a worse fate than a quick death by the sword. So let’s look at why Israel couldn’t adopt Canaanite children. Continue reading

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The Horror of Canaanite Children’s “Family” Life

Although this post neither addresses the Lord’s motive for taking the life of the Canaanite children nor the fairness of it, before we get into those things, we need to understand the context. This, too, is sad to read, but we must not imagine Canaanite children as being in any kind of a normal home by Western standards, or even most Ancient Near Eastern family standards. Canaanite childhood wasn’t a fun Brady Bunch or Modern Family existence: it was horrific.

Life was hard on Canaanite children because, among other things, the Canaanites committed two types of sins which damaged their children. Continue reading

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Why Kill the Canaanites’ Animals?

We saw in my prior post that we have no reason to believe that any of the adults were good in the territory that God ordered Israel to conquer. Not even one. But in some towns the Lord ordered that Israel kill all of the animals–“everything that breathes.” (e.g., Deut. 13:15; 20:16). Why kill the Canaanites’ animals?

Now what is written here is gross. But I’ve found, dear reader, that you need to be grossed out, disgusted, and maybe a little sickened, if you are going to understand the motivation behind God’s judgment of the Canaanites. Continue reading

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Were There Any Innocent Canaanites?

In my last post I wrote that God ordered the capital punishment of the inhabitants of the land God had given Israel because they were guilty of depravity and violence. The Canaanites heard of the miraculous approach of the Israelites and knew that Israel’s God was helping them, but some chose to fight rather than flee. As the Canaanite prostitute, Rahab, told Israel’s spies who had entered Jericho:

I know that the LORD has given you the land, and that the terror of you has fallen on us, and that all the inhabitants of the land have melted away before you. For we have heard how the LORD dried up the water of the Red Sea before you when you came out of Egypt, and what you did to the two kings of the Amorites who were beyond the Jordan, to Sihon and Og, whom you utterly destroyed. When we heard it, our hearts melted and no courage remained in any man any longer because of you; for the LORD your God, He is God in heaven above and on earth beneath” (Josh. 2:9-11).

Thus, those who were sensitive to the Lord’s warning had the opportunity to flee but many remained. Skeptics will object, however, that certainly there must have been some adult Canaanites who were innocent of those evils.

Continue reading

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Canaanite Destruction Not Genocide but Capital Punishment

God Ordered the Canaanite Destruction Because of Their Sins

In my introductory post I wrote that what God ordered Israel to do to the Canaanites wasn’t genocide but capital punishment. I say this was capital punishment for four reasons. First, the Lord clearly explains that He ordered the Canaanite destruction because of their sinfulness. In Leviticus chapter 18:6-23 the Lord says that the Canaanites—who lived within the territory that God had given Israel—were guilty of incest, adultery, burning their children in the arms of a bull-headed idol named Molech, homosexuality, and bestiality. The Lord then warned in Leviticus 18:24-26, 28:

Do not make yourselves unclean by any of these things, for by all these the nations I am driving out before you have become unclean, and the land became unclean, so that I punished its iniquity, and the land vomited out its inhabitants. But you shall keep my statutes and my rules and do none of these abominations… lest the land vomit you out when you make it unclean, as it vomited out the nation that was before you.

That’s pretty clear, right?

Continue reading

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Was the Destruction of the Canaanites Just?

In recent years, much has been said and written about the Lord ordering Israel to destroy the Canaanites. This is largely because the new atheists proclaim it as “divine genocide.” But it’s not just a problem for Christianity’s detractors. Indeed, many Christians worry about the fairness of killing the Canaanites. After all, if the Old Testament commands are to be taken at face value, it would appear that the Lord ordered Israel to kill every Canaanite man, woman, and child that refused to leave a particular geographical area. Consider just one passage from Deuteronomy 20:16-18:

In the cities of these peoples that the Lord your God is giving you for an inheritance, you shall save alive nothing that breathes, but you shall devote them to complete destruction, the Hittites and the Amorites, the Canaanites and the Perizzites, the Hivites and the Jebusites, as the Lord your God has commanded, that they may not teach you to do according to all their abominable practices that they have done for their gods, and so you sin against the Lord your God.

These words trouble many Christians and skeptics grouse that such a God is a “moral monster.”1 Do Christians need to worry, and are skeptics right to impugn God’s character, concerning this? No. My thesis is simple, God had good reason to destroy those Canaanites who refused to leave the area God had given Israel and this wasn’t divine genocide but capital punishment.

I’ve already published two articles on the destruction of the Canaanites: the first in Philosophia Christi, “We Don’t Hate Sin so We Don’t Understand what Happened to the Canaanites” and the second in the Christian Research Journal, “Killing the Canaanites.”  But there is a lot more to say, so I’ve decided to write several posts on the topic. In these posts I will examine such things as the Canaanite’s sinfulness, whether there were any innocent Canaanites, whether killing children could be fair, whether hyperbole can help explain these killings, and the implications for our own society’s Canaanization.

  1. For example, see Hector Avalos, “Yahweh is a Moral Monster,” The Christian Delusion: Why Faith Fails, John W. Loftus, ed., (Amherst: Prometheus, 2010), 209-236. []
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Sometimes Answering an Atheist Dignifies Folly

Our contention is simple: taking some atheist arguments seriously dignifies folly, encourages self-satisfying flattery, and diminishes the power of gospel proclamation. The article that Joseph E. Gorra, the managing editor of Philosophia Christi, and I co-authored for the Christian Research Journal follows:

Christian apologists regularly face what we call the distraction challenge: the temptation to take seriously insubstantial objections against God’s existence. An insubstantial objection involves reasoning that is beyond or in spite of intellectual reasons or evidences; it may include nonintellectual or even anti-intellectual factors. We’re not saying that these insubstantial objections are unanswerable or that it is somehow wrong to answer them; we’re just saying that it might be more wise and prudent if our arguments and replies are attentive to the “reasons of the heart” and not only to those of the head.

Although atheists employ other types of insubstantial arguments, for the purpose of this article we will just consider as insubstantial their arguments from “luck.” Certainly not all atheists utilize insubstantial arguments of the kind that we describe. But our concern is this: by lending credence to insubstantial arguments, the Christian apologist risks dignifying folly, encouraging self-satisfying flattery, and ultimately diminishing the power of gospel proclamation. Continue reading

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